pages & panels

pages & panels

Was Black Widow the first female leader of a Marvel team, and Storm the second?
When the short-lived team the Champions comes together on the UCLA campus* to defend against an incursion by the evil Greek gods, Black Widow assumes control of the team without complaint (but with a weird crack about her looks / Cyclops / Chris Claremont [even though Chris Claremont wasn’t even writing X-Men when Angel left the team?]). It’s easy to buy Black Widow as a natural leader, given her experience with SHIELD and the Avengers and her general super-competence, but as far as I know this might be her only instance as official leader.
Four years later, when Cyclops quit the X-Men following the Dark Phoenix Saga, Storm is named the new team leader. It’s an obvious choice: she is wise, responsible, and the most powerful member of the team. Especially when the rest of the team is Colossus, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, and the 13 and a half year old Kitty Pryde, none of whom are exactly leadership material. Unlike Black Widow, Storm has remained leader off and on since.
I can’t think of any other teams previous to these, or around the same time, that had female leaders. It’s interesting that they’re both seen as successors to Cyclops, as Champions was originally supposed to be about Iceman and Angel before Len Wein made Tony Isabella add more characters, including one woman, to the team. Meanwhile, when Storm was created at the same time in Giant-Size X-Men, it was part of an intentional effort to diversify and internationalize the team. Something to consider in light of recent news, perhaps.
*The wrangling involved in getting all these characters at UCLA is pretty funny. Angel and Iceman were attending college after leaving the X-Men; Black Widow was there to apply for a job teaching Russian after leaving San Francisco and Daredevil; Hercules was giving a lecture; and Ghost Rider was just riding by.

Champions #2, January 1976. Tona Isabella, Don Heck, John Tartaglione, Phil Rachelson, and Irving Watanabe. Edited by Marv Wolfman.
Uncanny X-Men #139, November 1980. Chris Claremont / John Bryne, Terry Austin, Glynis Oliver, and Tom Orzechowski. Edited by Louise Jones.(if you reblog this, please leave the credits intact ūüĎć)
Was Black Widow the first female leader of a Marvel team, and Storm the second?
When the short-lived team the Champions comes together on the UCLA campus* to defend against an incursion by the evil Greek gods, Black Widow assumes control of the team without complaint (but with a weird crack about her looks / Cyclops / Chris Claremont [even though Chris Claremont wasn’t even writing X-Men when Angel left the team?]). It’s easy to buy Black Widow as a natural leader, given her experience with SHIELD and the Avengers and her general super-competence, but as far as I know this might be her only instance as official leader.
Four years later, when Cyclops quit the X-Men following the Dark Phoenix Saga, Storm is named the new team leader. It’s an obvious choice: she is wise, responsible, and the most powerful member of the team. Especially when the rest of the team is Colossus, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, and the 13 and a half year old Kitty Pryde, none of whom are exactly leadership material. Unlike Black Widow, Storm has remained leader off and on since.
I can’t think of any other teams previous to these, or around the same time, that had female leaders. It’s interesting that they’re both seen as successors to Cyclops, as Champions was originally supposed to be about Iceman and Angel before Len Wein made Tony Isabella add more characters, including one woman, to the team. Meanwhile, when Storm was created at the same time in Giant-Size X-Men, it was part of an intentional effort to diversify and internationalize the team. Something to consider in light of recent news, perhaps.
*The wrangling involved in getting all these characters at UCLA is pretty funny. Angel and Iceman were attending college after leaving the X-Men; Black Widow was there to apply for a job teaching Russian after leaving San Francisco and Daredevil; Hercules was giving a lecture; and Ghost Rider was just riding by.

Champions #2, January 1976. Tona Isabella, Don Heck, John Tartaglione, Phil Rachelson, and Irving Watanabe. Edited by Marv Wolfman.
Uncanny X-Men #139, November 1980. Chris Claremont / John Bryne, Terry Austin, Glynis Oliver, and Tom Orzechowski. Edited by Louise Jones.(if you reblog this, please leave the credits intact ūüĎć)

Was Black Widow the first female leader of a Marvel team, and Storm the second?

When the short-lived team the Champions¬†comes together on the UCLA campus* to defend against an incursion by the evil Greek gods, Black Widow assumes control of the team without complaint (but with a weird crack about her looks / Cyclops / Chris Claremont [even though Chris Claremont wasn’t even writing X-Men when Angel left the team?]). It’s easy to buy Black Widow as a natural leader, given her experience with SHIELD and the Avengers and her general super-competence, but as far as I know this might be her only instance as official leader.

Four years later, when Cyclops quit the X-Men following the Dark Phoenix Saga, Storm is named the new team leader. It’s an obvious choice: she is wise, responsible, and the most powerful member of the team. Especially when the rest of the team is Colossus, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, and the 13 and a half year old Kitty Pryde, none of whom are exactly leadership material. Unlike Black Widow, Storm has remained leader off and on since.

I can’t think of any other teams previous to these, or around the same time, that had female leaders. It’s interesting that they’re both seen as successors to Cyclops, as¬†Champions was originally supposed to be about Iceman and Angel before Len Wein made Tony Isabella add more characters, including one woman, to the team. Meanwhile, when Storm was created at the same time in Giant-Size X-Men, it was part of an intentional effort to diversify and internationalize the team. Something to consider in light of recent news, perhaps.


*The wrangling involved in getting all these characters at UCLA is pretty funny. Angel and Iceman were attending college after leaving the X-Men; Black Widow was there to apply for a job teaching Russian after leaving San Francisco and Daredevil; Hercules was giving a lecture; and Ghost Rider was just riding by.

Champions #2, January 1976. Tona Isabella, Don Heck, John Tartaglione, Phil Rachelson, and Irving Watanabe. Edited by Marv Wolfman.

Uncanny X-Men #139, November 1980. Chris Claremont / John Bryne, Terry Austin, Glynis Oliver, and Tom Orzechowski. Edited by Louise Jones.

(if you reblog this, please leave the credits intact ūüĎć)

hawque:

Kitty Pryde, asking the really important questions.
(Kitty Pryde Agent of SHIELD #1, Larry Hama, Jesus Redondo, Sergio Melia)

hawque:

Kitty Pryde, asking the really important questions.

(Kitty Pryde Agent of SHIELD #1, Larry Hama, Jesus Redondo, Sergio Melia)

I think Matthew Wilson is my favorite colorist on the books I read, and this page from Secret Avengers is a good illustration why.
Check out the range and vibrancy of his palette, from the various shades of cool blue in the dark room, to the lighter blue of the medical-tube goop, to the bright green of the night-vision goggles, to the bright pink of Snapper’s encased brain. Dig his detailed shading on the night-vision goggles’ light trails, on the light and shadow on Maria Hill’s face, in MODOK’s gaping mouth.
It occurs to me that a theme of Secret Avengers is juxtaposition. You can see it in Michael Walsh’s art, which somehow manages to be cartoony and grubby and realistic all at once; in the dark colors of a night mission or secret lab set against the bright tones of science; in Ales Kot’s writing which mixes dangerous spy capers against lots of jokes. Really, in the idea of the Secret Avengers itself, where members of the most famous, flashy group in the Marvel Universe do secret missions as a team that doesn’t exist. Basically, its a great book.
Secret Avengers #4, June 2014. Ales Kot, Michael Walsh, and Matthew Wilson. Edited by Wil Moss and Jon Moisan.

I think Matthew Wilson is my favorite colorist on the books I read, and this page from Secret Avengers is a good illustration why.

Check out the range and vibrancy of his palette, from the various shades of cool blue in the dark room, to the lighter blue of the medical-tube goop, to the bright green of the night-vision goggles, to the bright pink of Snapper’s encased brain. Dig his detailed shading on the night-vision goggles’ light trails, on the light and shadow on Maria Hill’s face, in MODOK’s gaping mouth.

It occurs to me that a theme of Secret Avengers is juxtaposition. You can see it in Michael Walsh’s art, which somehow manages to be cartoony and grubby and realistic all at once; in the dark colors of a night mission or secret lab set against the bright tones of science; in Ales Kot’s writing which mixes dangerous spy capers against lots of jokes. Really, in the idea of the Secret Avengers itself, where members of the most famous, flashy group in the Marvel Universe do secret missions as a team that doesn’t exist. Basically, its a great book.


Secret Avengers #4, June 2014. Ales Kot, Michael Walsh, and Matthew Wilson. Edited by Wil Moss and Jon Moisan.

Superhero phone contacts.
Amazing Spider-Man #2, May 2014. Dan Slott, Humberto Ramos, Victor Olazaba, Edgar Delgado.
She-Hulk #5, June 2014. Charles Soule, Ron Wimberly, Rico Renzi.
Daredevil #3, May 2014. Mark Waid, Chris Samnee, Javier Rodriguez.
Superhero phone contacts.
Amazing Spider-Man #2, May 2014. Dan Slott, Humberto Ramos, Victor Olazaba, Edgar Delgado.
She-Hulk #5, June 2014. Charles Soule, Ron Wimberly, Rico Renzi.
Daredevil #3, May 2014. Mark Waid, Chris Samnee, Javier Rodriguez.
Superhero phone contacts.
Amazing Spider-Man #2, May 2014. Dan Slott, Humberto Ramos, Victor Olazaba, Edgar Delgado.
She-Hulk #5, June 2014. Charles Soule, Ron Wimberly, Rico Renzi.
Daredevil #3, May 2014. Mark Waid, Chris Samnee, Javier Rodriguez.

Superhero phone contacts.

Amazing Spider-Man #2, May 2014. Dan Slott, Humberto Ramos, Victor Olazaba, Edgar Delgado.

She-Hulk #5, June 2014. Charles Soule, Ron Wimberly, Rico Renzi.

Daredevil #3, May 2014. Mark Waid, Chris Samnee, Javier Rodriguez.

Rasputin is creepy.
Hellboy: Wake the Devilby Mike Mignolacolor: James Sinclairletters: Pat Brosseau
Rasputin is creepy.
Hellboy: Wake the Devilby Mike Mignolacolor: James Sinclairletters: Pat Brosseau

Rasputin is creepy.

Hellboy: Wake the Devil
by Mike Mignola
color: James Sinclair
letters: Pat Brosseau

Oh boy, these pages. Oh boy, this arc. I love that these were made for a hero book called Daredevil, and that Daredevil barely even appears until the last issue of this four-issue arc about Ben Urich investigating a traumatized child. Also: the insert in which JJJ’s dialogue is delivered by his cigar.It seems to me that, of all the big comics writers of the last however long, Bendis has the foremost eye for working with innovative artists. This arc was shortly before he took over Daredevil with Alex Maleev, which was shortly before he started Alias with Michael Gaydos, making it a very fruitful mid-to-late 2001. His current work on Uncanny X-Men has featured some of the most creative art of our time from Frazer Irving, Chris Bachalo, and now Marco Rudy.

Daredevil #16 (Wake Up, part one), May 2001.writer: Brian Michael Bendisart: David Mack
Oh boy, these pages. Oh boy, this arc. I love that these were made for a hero book called Daredevil, and that Daredevil barely even appears until the last issue of this four-issue arc about Ben Urich investigating a traumatized child. Also: the insert in which JJJ’s dialogue is delivered by his cigar.It seems to me that, of all the big comics writers of the last however long, Bendis has the foremost eye for working with innovative artists. This arc was shortly before he took over Daredevil with Alex Maleev, which was shortly before he started Alias with Michael Gaydos, making it a very fruitful mid-to-late 2001. His current work on Uncanny X-Men has featured some of the most creative art of our time from Frazer Irving, Chris Bachalo, and now Marco Rudy.

Daredevil #16 (Wake Up, part one), May 2001.writer: Brian Michael Bendisart: David Mack

Oh boy, these pages. Oh boy, this arc. I love that these were made for a hero book called¬†Daredevil, and that Daredevil barely even appears until the last issue of this four-issue arc about Ben Urich investigating a traumatized child. Also: the insert in which JJJ’s dialogue is delivered by his cigar.

It seems to me that, of all the big comics writers of the last however long, Bendis has the foremost eye for working with innovative artists. This arc was shortly before he took over Daredevil with Alex Maleev, which was shortly before he started Alias with Michael Gaydos, making it a very fruitful mid-to-late 2001. His current work on Uncanny X-Men has featured some of the most creative art of our time from Frazer Irving, Chris Bachalo, and now Marco Rudy.

Daredevil #16 (Wake Up, part one), May 2001.
writer: Brian Michael Bendis
art: David Mack

"I am Groot!” - Triumphant"I am Groot." - Inquisitive"…I am Groot!" - Alarmed
Guardians of the Galaxy #3, June 2013.writer: Brian Michael Bendispencils: Steve McNiven & Sara Pichelliink: John Dell, Steve McNiven & Sara Pichellicolors: Justin Ponsorletters: Cory Petit

"I am Groot! - Triumphant
"I am Groot." - Inquisitive
"…I am Groot!" - Alarmed

Guardians of the Galaxy #3, June 2013.
writer: Brian Michael Bendis
pencils: Steve McNiven & Sara Pichelli
ink: John Dell, Steve McNiven & Sara Pichelli
colors: Justin Ponsor
letters: Cory Petit

I’ve been catching up on Matt Fraction and Karl Kesel and Mark Bagley’s Fantastic Four run, which is great. The space-time adventures are creative and trippy and the family dynamics are deeply felt and affecting. That’s the appeal of the Fantastic Four in a nutshell, and this team did its incredibly strong legacy proud. This issue, where the Four travel back to the Ides of March and discover Julius Caesar was replaced by a pink alien mist creature (also seen in FF #9), is classic Fantastic Four.


Fantastic Four #5, March 2013.writer: Matt Fractionpencils: Mark Bagleyink: Mark Farmercolor: Paul Mounts

I’ve been catching up on Matt Fraction and Karl Kesel and Mark Bagley’s¬†Fantastic Four¬†run, which is great. The space-time adventures are creative and trippy and the family dynamics are deeply felt and affecting. That’s the appeal of the Fantastic Four in a nutshell, and this team did its incredibly strong legacy proud. This issue, where the Four travel back to the Ides of March and discover Julius Caesar was replaced by a pink alien mist creature (also seen in FF #9), is classic Fantastic Four.

Fantastic Four #5, March 2013.
writer: Matt Fraction
pencils: Mark Bagley
ink: Mark Farmer
color: Paul Mounts

stevelieber:

Superior Foes of Spider-Man #13: The Cosplay Cover! I like to think this image tells Marvel fans everything they need to know about our cast.
Lineart by Steve Lieber (from an suggestion of Jeff Parker’s.) Color by Rachelle Rosenberg.

I’m surprised Fred isn’t Dormammu. Beetle is perfect.

stevelieber:

Superior Foes of Spider-Man #13: The Cosplay Cover! I like to think this image tells Marvel fans everything they need to know about our cast.

Lineart by Steve Lieber (from an suggestion of Jeff Parker’s.) Color by Rachelle Rosenberg.

I’m surprised Fred isn’t Dormammu. Beetle is perfect.

brianmichaelbendis:

Jessica Jones (Alias #16, 2002)
Art by Michael Gaydos & Matt Hollingsworth

brianmichaelbendis:

Jessica Jones (Alias #16, 2002)

Art by Michael Gaydos & Matt Hollingsworth